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How to close a conversation?

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Every conversation has to end. Otherwise, you will just revolve around in a continuous loop with no end in sight. However, you should take care to end your conversation in the most gracious manner. This will ensure that the rapport between you and the listener stays intact. Conversations can be of any types; it can be verbal, written and presentation. In all the three types of conversation, appropriate closure is important to conclude a conversation. Use your English language skills to gracefully close a conversation while keeping the relation and tone intact.

close a conversation

Things to remember when closing a conversation:


1. Observe body language

Body language is an important indicator of how to end a conversation. Format and develop your tone and words, taking cues from the listener's body language. Keep it short and concise for quick closures.

2. Suggest a different time

If you want to meet the person again, it is preferable to suggest an alternative meeting place or time. Say that you have an important work at present and would like to meet  him/her again. This will make the person understand that you are interested and are not leaving intentionally.

3. Smile

It is always important to smile at the end of a conversation. This will keep the rapport pleasant and conducive. Leaving with a frown is actually considered rude. Use your smile along with your fluent English speaking skills to make a good impression on the listener.

exit

Sample conversations for ending conversations:


1. Informal Situations:

a. 'I am sorry, but I have to leave now'.
b. 'Goodbye'.
c. 'How about we talk later?'
d. 'This was fun, but am running late'.
e. 'I wish I could talk some more, but I have to leave now.'
f. 'I promised to meet my fiancé in 15 minutes. Got to run.'
g. 'Well, Namita, it was great to talk with you. I need to run because I need to get to the pharmacy before it closes.'

2. Formal Situations:

a. 'I am afraid that I have lost track of time.'
b. 'I don't want to keep you engaged. I can see you are busy.'
c. 'How about next Tuesday morning?'
d. 'It was really great to meet you Sanjay, but I have to leave now.'
e. 'I really enjoyed our conversation, Tracy'.
f. 'See you next time, John. Take Care.'

Written communication:

a. I am signing off now. I've got a deadline I need to meet before noon.
b. I'm hoping to see your reply as soon as possible.
c. Just wanted to see how the new job is going. Take Care!
d. It was great catching up with you. Would be a pleasure to meet you again.
e. Thank you for your information.

nice to meet you

The above samples should show you how to end a conversation without hurting the feelings of the other person. Continuously improve your spoken English by framing new phrases to end a conversation. It will improve your confidence to start and end new conversations. It will also make you comfortable while approaching strangers. Practice the above phrase with the help of an online English teacher.

About eAgeTutor:


eAgeTutor.com is the premier online tutoring provider. eAge's world class faculty and ace communication experts from around the globe help you to improve in an all round manner. Assignments and tasks based on a well researched content developed by subject matter and industry experts can certainly fetch the most desired results for improving spoken English skills. Overcoming limitations is just a click of mouse away in this age of effective and advance communication technology. For further information on online English speaking course or to experience the wonders of virtual classroom fix a demonstration session with our tutor. Please visit www.eagetutor.com.

Contact us today to know more about our spoken English program and experience the exciting world of e-learning.

- By Shailja Varma

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