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Because, as, since, for – how, where & when to use?

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'Because, as, since, for' are words that are used to denote tenses. Their correct usage is important for framing grammatically correct sentences. However, many English students falter while using these words because of their confusing nature. The primary confusion arises from the fact that these words mean the same fundamentally. If you are one of those students finding difficulties in understanding these words, clear them away with the help of below explanations.

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1. Because

A sentence may contain an activity that denotes the significance of reason. The word 'because' is used to stress the importance of reason. The usage of because depends on the importance of the reason specified in the sentence. The clause that uses because usually occurs at the end of the sentence.

Examples:

1. I went to Germany last week because I wanted to visit a European country this vacation.
2. I couldn't go trekking because my brother did not keep his promise.
3. I am sad because we lost the game.
4. We missed the train because I got up late.
5. He should apologize because he is the one responsible.

2. As

'As' is used while the reason is already known and hence the importance of that clause diminishes. 'As' can occur before or after a sentence. Usually, it is placed at the beginning. It is often used in the British English version.

Examples:

1. As she is broke now, could she please have this employment?
2. I thought Suresh was out as his vehicle wasn't there.
3. As we lost the quarterfinals, we could not enter into the semi finals'.
4. As the match had already started, we went up to the stadium and occupied some empty seats there.
5. I want someone who is as talented as I am.

where to use the words

3. Since

Since is used to denote words to signify why an activity is performed. It is used to establish true facts. Since closely means because. It is often used interchangeably with because due to its same meaning.Since can be used in the beginning of a sentence but not because.

Examples:

1. We decided to go shopping since it was a nice day.
2. Since Bush has become President, the Russians have come to the negotiating table.
3. Since Priya has already eaten, I will make do with soup.
4. Since I was hungry, I decided to have a burger.
5. I had to stay at home since my mom is not well.

4. For

For is used to put in a reason in a sentence. It is not used at the beginning of a sentence and is often used in the middle or at the end of a sentence. For is known as a coordinating conjunction and is used regularly.

Example:

1. I decided to stop the work I was doing for it was very late.
2. I am going to stay at home and complete the assignment for the deadline is coming near.

arrangement of words

The above explanations will help you to clarify your confusion and doubts and improve your English speaking skills. Practice them regularly with the help of an online English trainer.

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Related Topics:

1. Use of could, should, would?
2. When to use the articles - a, an, the?
3. Common 'Singular-Plural' Mistakes – Part I
4. Use the Power of Phrases to Improve Your Spoken English Fluency
5. Do you know what are words with similar pronunciation but with different meaning/spelling known as?

    

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