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How to improve English with funny idioms? – Part one

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In our last blog, we described funny idioms that are often used by the native speakers in the day to day communication. Funny idioms not only add a humorous touch but also make you a pro-English speaker. Let us have a look at the remaining idioms that are funnier than the previous one.


funny idiom to improve English 1


6 Funny idioms you must know

1. Chew the fat

This idiom means to chat in a friendly and leisurely way or engage in casual gossip sessions. It is generally said to stem from the practice of sailors, who while working together would converse leisurely while chewing on salt-hardened fat. In American English, this idiom is known as chew the rag.

Example - Women generally meet and visit friend’s house to chew the fat.


2. For donkey’s years

This British idiom refers to the length of years the animal works with nothing to show for it. If someone has done something for donkey’s years, then they have done it for an unpleasant long time without much to show for it.

Example – I have been working in this company for donkey’s years. I think I must look for a change.


3. Hairy at the heel

Hairy at the heel means someone who is dangerous and untrustworthy.

Example - I don’t know whether I like Kevin or not. After meeting him twice I feel he’s a bit hairy at the heels.


4. Enough to cobble dogs with

This idiom means surplus of anything. The idiom becomes humorous when you consider a cobbler who repairs shoes. If a cobbler has enough leather to cobble an animal that has four feet, then that cobbler has a surplus.

Example – Don’t worry. We have got enough beer to cobble dogs with.


5. Do a Devon Loch

If someone does a Devon Loch, they suddenly fail when everybody expects them to succeed or someone who collapses at the last minute when they were almost winning. This idiom is taken from Devon Loch, a racehorse that collapsed just before winning the line of the 1956 Grand National race in the UK.

Example - It was shocking how Mumbai Indians did a Devon Loch in the last minutes of the match against Chennai Super Kings.


6. Cat got your tongue

This idiom reflects from the middle ages when witches were greatly feared. A witch’s cat would steal the tongue of a person to prevent them from telling others.

Example - What’s the matter? Cat got your tongue?


These are the remaining idioms which are funny and which will help improve your English. Regular practice and proper usage can improve your English communication skills like a native speaker.


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- By Shailja Varma


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